Clara, Amadeus, Chopin in Vivay

by Neila Mezynski
 

She sing her sweet song for him on top of mountain, he might come down for cake and tea. Unsociable, working on his book for social develop on human. Being. All. Too. She made tea for visiting powered donut wig one, he did. Come. Other Mr. B. likes her too much, she was spoken for, have to stop writing those sweet notes for her only, made other him jealous. Lost his mind finally, too busy with notes not his, playing them all day, not his, other one with dark hair and bad cold came to stay brought his lady friend with boy name, tight pants and piano although it was awful heavy getting to the top of the mountain. Castles are high usually on the Alps. Need a ski lift or slaves who carry it up if their master ask. Plenty of resentment there after piano toting incident. He said they would. Be. Write book about. Even. Keep those fire going. Could get a kiss on the forehead or some bread. Other dark hair bad cold one couldn’t. Write. Only sweet notes on paper, his nose in the middle of his face. Slave were happy when they heard the sweet piano sound come from the powdery white head one in red velvet and black velvet one with bad cold. Paid off. Resentful fade. Plowing wheat field on top of mountain. Alp. No sense. Sweet notes not wheat. Food for the starved.

Music always does

that

Chopin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neila Mezynski is author of Glimpses and A Story (2013) from Scrambler Books, two pamphlets (Girls In Trees and forthcoming Tucson Dessert) from Greying Ghost Press, echapbooks from Radioactive Press (Yellow Fringe Dress) and Patasola Press (The Pure Girl), chapbooks from Folded Word Press (Men Who Understand Girls, 2012), Nap Chapbook, (Floaters , 2012), Deadly Chaps Press (Dancers On Rock, (2011), Warriors, 2013) and Mud Luscious Press (At The Beach 2011).

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2 thoughts on “Clara, Amadeus, Chopin in Vivay

  1. […] Clara, Amadeus, Chopin in Vivay Neila Mezynski […]

  2. Ah! I like the choppy feel of this. Does not feel particularly like Chopin to me, but I appreciate the experimentation. This is one of those pieces where I’d love to read an author commentary. Curious for more…

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